Category Archives: Topic_1. Weltkrieg

Workshop: Blickwechsel auf Augenhöhe. Neue Perspektiven auf die Frauen- und Geschlechtergeschichte, 14.10.2022, Hamburg

Arbeitskreis Historische Frauen- und Geschlechter­forschung e.V. – Region Nord und Forschungsstelle für Zeitgeschichte in Hamburg (FZH) (Web)

Zeit: 14.10.2022
Ort: Forschungsstelle für Zeitgeschichte in Hamburg

Im Zentrum des Nachwuchsworkshops steht die gemeinsame Arbeit an konkreten Frage- und Problemstellungen laufender Promotionsprojekte zur Frauen- und Geschlechtergeschichte. Die Promovierenden bekommen die Möglichkeit, in offener Atmosphäre aktuelle Herausforderungen ihrer Projekte an konkreten Beispielen vorzustellen und zu diskutieren. In Kleingruppen aus den jeweils Vortragenden, einerM erfahrenen Wissenschafter:in sowie interessierten Mitdiskutant:innen soll ein sicherer Raum zum kollektiven Nach- und Weiterdenken entstehen und gemeinsam an den Frage- und Problemstellungen gearbeitet werden.

Programm (u.a.)

  • Shuyang Song  (Berlin): Das internationale Netzwerk der Westdeutschen Frauenfriedensbewegung (1951–1974)
  • Sophia König (Leipzig): Zwischen Professionalisierung und ideologischer Vereinnahmung: Hebammen in Leipzig zwischen 1918 und 1945
  • Alexander Buerstedde (FZH): Wann ist ein Priester ein ‚Mann‘? Aushandlungsprozesse priesterlicher ‚Männlichkeiten‘ in der westdeutschen katholischen Kirche zwischen 1945 und 1989/90
  • Lara-Marie Hägerling (Braunschweig): Politisierung in Zeiten des Wandels – Alltag und Politik bürgerlicher Frauen in der Novemberrevolution 1918/19
  • Ruth Pope (FZH): In Kellern und auf Dachböden – Quellenprobleme bei der Erforschung feministischer Beratungsstellen gegen sexualisierte Gewalt an Kindern. Weiterlesen und Quelle … (Web)

Die Anmeldung bis zum 10.10.2022 bei nord@akhfg.de

Klicktipp: The Empire Suffrage Syllabus on the history of women’s suffrage in the U.S. (Portal)

Women and Social Movements in the United States 1600-2000

„Women and Social Movements“ is a resource of U.S. history and U.S. women’s history. The colletion is accessible for members. Read more … (Web)

The Empire Suffrage Syllabus (Web)

For the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution „Women and Social Movements“ published the „Empire Suffrage Syllabus“. This collection contains four modules as starter-kits, each providing conceptual questions, key themes, annotated secondary readings, suggested primary sources, and accompanying digital humanities resources to help to rethink U.S. women’s suffrage by foregrounding the framework of empire. The syllabus is available open access.

  • Module 1 | Women, Modern States, and Racial Empires

… introduces the imperial and revolutionary contexts for new ideas about race, gender, and political participation at the turn of the 19th century, setting the stage for the rise in the importance of voting. (Link)

  • Module 2 | Women’s Voting and U.S. Empire

… highlights women’s electoral participation as both agents and opponents of U.S. territorial expansion and colonial rule. (Link)

  • Module 3 | Women’s Anti-Imperialist Political Activism

… considers the transnational and grassroots activisms of colonized and women of color in the pursuit of liberation that has transcended both electoral politics and national sovereignty itself. (Link)

  • Module 4 | Who Ran, Why They Lost, Why They Won

… explores women who ran for the highest political office in the U.S., the barriers that impede their success, and women worldwide who have become heads of state. (Link)

Klicktipp: „Finding Women in the Sources“: Women’s labour activism in Eastern Europe and transnationally (ZARAH-Weblog) – new postings online

ZARAH: Women’s labour activism in Eastern Europe and transnationally (Web)

In February 2020, the ERC-advanced-grant-project ZARAH project started. ZARAH explores the history of women’s labour activism and organizing – from the age of empires to the late 20th century. The aim is to present the working conditions and living conditions of lower class and working class women and their communities and to move these women from the margins of labour and gender studies and European history to the centre of historical research. The Austrian part of this histories is worked out by Veronika Helfert. Read more … (Web).

ZARAH weblog

In September 2020, the ZARAH weblog started. The first blog series were „Finding Women in the Sources“, „Putting Activists Centre Stage“ and „Transnational Links“ (Web):

Series III: Transnational Links and the History of Women’s Labour Activism

  • Alexandra Ghit, Olga Gnydiuk, and Eszter Varsar: An Introduction
  • Selin Çağatay: Tracing Transnational Connections in Trade Union Women’s Education: The ICFTU Women’s Committee in Turkey
  • Eszter Varsar: Gender, Anarchist Thought and Women in the Agrarian Socialist Movement in Hungary and Internationally
  • Olga Gnydiuk: In the Web of a Male-dominated Trade Union International: Women and the World Federation of Trade Unions
  • Ivelina Masheva: Exchange and Cooperation between Bulgarian Communist Women and the International Women’s Secretariat of the Comintern in the early 1920s
  • Alexandra Ghit: Solidarity and Inequality: European Socialist Women’s International Organizing in the Interwar Period

Series II: Putting Activists Centre Stage Continue reading

CfP: Nineteenth-Century Women and Conflicts of Law: Global Perspectives, 1815-1919 (Publication); by – extended: 15.01.2023

Ginger Frost, Samford University et.al. (Web)

Proposals by – extended: 15.01.2023

The volume discusses the consequences for women when law systems clashed – between independent nations, colonizers and colonized, majority and minority religions, or between secular and religious laws. The nineteenth and twentieth centuries saw industrial nations draw more and more of the globe into the orbit of their law systems, and these were also the centuries in which women contested their legal positions vigorously. Thus, this period offers an ideal forum for studying the effects of legal differences across the globe. Conflicts of law were inevitable whenever people crossed borders, converted to different religions, or married/divorced someone of a different class, religion, or locality. Women were often harmed by conflicts of law, but this was not inevitable. In other words, these clashes offered both a challenge and an opportunity.

This volume has no geographical limitations; we welcome proposals from historians of all parts of the world. The most important factor for selection will be the authors‘ ability to highlight women’s experiences when law systems clashed. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Conflicts between criminal and civil law
  • Conflicts over differing national laws of marriage, divorce, and child custody
  • Women in imperial law systems
  • The interaction between gender and other factors such as race, class, and sexual orientation in the law courts
  • Conflict between secular and religious courts
  • The consequences of the lack of legal recognition for lesbian and transgender families
  • The regulation and criminalization of sex work across national borders
  • Women as actors in the international legal community
  • Feminist efforts to eliminate women’s disabilities caused by conflicts of law
  • Disputes over nationality, dual nationality, and statelessness in peace and war

Continue reading

Sessions „Gendered Work, Gendered Struggles: Working Women’s Activism in Long-Term and Comparative Perspective“ and „Rediscovering spaces of gender history in Poland and Czechoslovakia“, 24.-25.08.2022, Poznań

The International Federation for Research in Women’s History (IFRWH) (Web)

Time: 24.-25.08.2022
Venue: Poznań, Poland

The IFRWH organizes these two sessions at the XXIII International Congress of Historical Sciences 2020/2022 in Poznań in Poland (Web)

Gendered Work, Gendered Struggles: Working Women’s Activism in Long-Term and Comparative Perspective (Link)

  • Veronika Helfert and Katharina Hermann: Women on strike! Participation of women in mass strike movements in Austria and Switzerland at the end of First World War
  • Anne Zacharias-Walsh: By women, for women: The rise of women-only labor unions in Japan
  • Cristina Borderias and Manuela Martini: Gendered division of work and labour conflicts in the Lyon silk and Barcelona cotton trades in the 19th century
  • Laura Savelli: The State Must Be the Role Model. Issues and struggles of women workers in PTT services in the first half of the 20th century
  • Emma Amador: Demanding Equality: Puerto Rican Women Workers and the Fight for Social Security in the US Territories
  • Görkem Akgöu and Alexandra Ghit: Peripheral to industrial work? Gendered bodies and sexualities in post-1945 labor’s discourses in Turkey and Romania
  • Immanuel Harisch: Paving the way for women workers at the workplace and within unions: Nigerian women trade union officials and their labor activism during the 1960s
  • Chair: Susan Zimmermann

Rediscovering spaces of gender history in Poland and Czechoslovakia (Web)

  • Dietlind Hüchtker: Space and gender. Autobiographical texts of 1961 in postwar Poland Continue reading

Klicktipp: Interview at NOTCHES with Jen Manion: Female Husbands: A Trans History (Online-Publication)

NOTCHES: (Re)Marks on the history of sexuality (Web)

NOTCHES is a open-access, peer-reviewed, collaborative and international weblog for the history of sexualities, sponsored by the Raphael Samuel History Centre in London.

The posts are sorted by different categories. In addition to a geographical assignment or a time period, there are content categories. These categories are – among others – the following:

One of the latest posts in NOTCHES is an interview with Jen Manion about her new book „Female Husbands: A Trans History“ (published on 14 June 2022) (Web)

Jen Manion: Female Husbands: A Trans History

Long before people identified as transgender or lesbian, there were female husbands and the women who loved them. Female husbands – people assigned female who transed gender, lived as men, and married women – were true queer pioneers. Moving deftly from the colonial era to just before the First World War, Jen Manion uncovers the riveting and very personal stories of ordinary people who lived as men despite tremendous risk, danger, violence, and threat of punishment. Female Husbands weaves the story of their lives in relation to broader social, economic, and political developments in the US and the UK while also exploring how attitudes towards female husbands shifted in relation to transformations in gender politics and women’s rights, ultimately leading to the demise of the category of ‘female husband’ in the early twentieth century.

NOTCHES: In a few sentences, what is your book about?

Jen Manion: Female Husbands is about white working-class queer couples from the 18th and 19th centuries. The husbands were people assigned female at birth who transed gender, lived as men, and married a woman. Read more and source … (Web)

Vortrag: Paul Michael Lützeler: Bertha von Suttner als Schülerin Victor Hugos. Die Friedensbewegung vor dem Ersten Weltkrieg, 27.06.2022, Wien und virtueller Raum

IFK Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften I Kunstuniversität Linz in Wien (Web)

Time: 27.06.2022, 18:15 Uhr
Venue: Wien: IFK und virtueller Raum

Victor Hugo musste wegen der Gegnerschaft zu Napoleon III. Frankreich verlassen. Im Exil wurde er zum prominentesten Sprecher der europäischen Friedensbewegung. Bertha von Suttners Roman »Die Waffen nieder!« sowie ihre »Memoiren« zeigen, wie stark sie Hugo als Vorbild verstand, als sie nach dessen Tod den Friedensdiskurs prägte.
Bereits vor seinem Exil machte sich Victor Hugo in Paris einen Namen als Vertreter einer europäischen Unifikations- und internationalen Friedensbewegung. In diese Rolle wuchs er noch stärker hinein, als er wegen der Gegnerschaft zu Napoleon III. sein Heimatland verlassen musste. Hugo gehörte zu den bewunderten Autoren und Friedensaktivisten Bertha von Suttners. 1889 erschien ihr internationaler Bestseller Die Waffen nieder!, der ihr half, in die Fußstapfen Hugos zu treten. Zum einen zeigt das Buch, wie Hugos Roman Les Miserables mit seinem christlichen Ethos die Zielsetzungen des pazifistischen Romans der Autorin bestimmte. Und zum anderen – das dokumentieren auch ihre zwanzig Jahre später erschienenen Memoiren – sah sich von Suttner als zentrale Figur der internationalen Friedensbewegung in der Nachfolge Victor Hugos. Am Schluss des Vortrags wird aus Briefen an Bertha von Suttner zitiert, die einen Eindruck von ihrem Einfluss vermitteln: von Henry Dunant, Leo Tolstoi, Mark Twain, Andrew Carnegie und Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach.

Paul Michael Lützeler ist Rosa May Distinguished University Professor in the Humanities und Direktor des Max Kade Center for Contemporary German Literature. Im Mai und Juni 2022 ist er IFK_Gast des Direktors (Web).

Für die Teilnahme via Zoom ist eine Anmeldung zum Meeting mit Namen und E-Mailadresse notwendig. Weitere Informationen (Web). Den Zoom-Link erhalten Sie unmittelbar im Anschluss per E-Mail zugeschickt.

Klicktipp: Susanne Breuss: Die Küchen der Wiener Werkbundsiedlung. Kein Platz für Apfelstrudel (Onlinepublikation)

Wien Museum Magazin (Web)

veröffentlicht am 29.05.2022

Vor 90 Jahren, am 4. Juni 1932, wurde in Wien-Lainz die Werkbundsiedlung feierlich eröffnet, eine Mustersiedlung aus 70 Häusern nach Entwürfen in- und ausländischer Architekt*innen. Das mediale Echo war groß und reichte von enthusiastischem Zuspruch bis zu vehementer Ablehnung. Kritik gab es auch an den Küchen, einem Raumtypus, der damals noch ganz dem weiblichen Geschlecht zugeordnet war.

Drei Jahre zuvor hatte sich der Schriftsteller Stefan Zweig in seinen Überlegungen zur Frau der Zukunft zuversichtlich gezeigt, dass der Typus der bürgerlichen Hausfrau „im Sinne des immer wieder Kinder säugenden Haustiers, des plättenden, fegenden, kochenden, bürstenden, flickenden und sorgenden Domestiken ihres Hausgebieters und ihrer Kinder“ verschwinden werde. Woher er diesen Optimismus nahm? Nicht zuletzt vermutlich aus den zeitgenössischen Diskursen über die „neue Frau“, in denen die Forderung nach einer Modernisierung der Hauswirtschaft und nach neuen arbeitssparenden Küchen zentral war. Tatsächlich waren im Lauf der 1920er Jahre bereits zahlreiche neue technische Hilfsmittel auf den Markt gekommen, die eine Erleichterung der Hausarbeit versprachen. Auch Architektur und Möbeldesign widmeten sich verstärkt der Frage, wie die Hausarbeit schneller, müheloser und hygienischer vonstatten gehen könnte.

Neuorganisation nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg

Solche Fragen waren nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg virulent geworden, da sich die sozialen, ökonomischen und geschlechterpolitischen Rahmenbedingungen stark geändert hatten. Viele Frauen konnten oder wollten nicht mehr den Großteil ihrer Zeit und Energie dem häuslichen Leben widmen. So war der Anteil erwerbstätiger Frauen und damit die Mehrfachbelastung auch in den bürgerlichen Schichten gestiegen, während gleichzeitig das früher billig zur Verfügung stehende Dienstpersonal nun oft wegfiel. Weiterlesen … (Web)

Vortrag: Clara-Anna Egger: Die Internationale Frauenfriedensbewegung von 1915 bis zum Zweiten Weltkrieg, 02.05.2022, Wien

Frauenbildungsstätte Frauenhetz (Web)
Zeit: Mo., 02.05.2022, 18:00 Uhr
Ort: Frauenbildungsstätte Frauenhetz, Untere Weißgerberstr. 41, 1030 Wien
Der Erste Weltkrieg rief einen Bruch in der internationalen Frauenbewegung des frühen 20. Jahrhunderts hervor. Eine Abspaltung pazifistisch-gesinnter Frauenwahlrechts-Aktivistinnen von patriotischen Gruppen in den Frauenrechts-Organisationen leitete die Geburtsstunde der organisierten Frauenfriedensbewegung ein. Unter dem Namen „Women’s International League for Peace und Freedom“ organisierten sich Pazifistinnen, um auf der internationalen Bühne für den Frieden zu kämpfen. Wie organisierten Frauen die Friedensarbeit zwischen den zwei Weltkriegen?

  • Moderation: Birge Krondorfer

Clara-Anna Egger ist Historikerin an der Universität Wien (PraeDoc in der Vienna Doctoral School of Historical and Cultural Studies). Seit Oktober 2021 bis Mai 2022 ist sie Marietta Blau-Stipendiatin des Österreichischen Austauschdienst (OeAD). Die Schwerpunkte ihrer Forschung sind Feministischer Pazifismus, Zeitgeschichte, Frauenbewegungen und Auto-/Biografieforschung. Ihr Dissertationsprojekt hat den Titel „Practicing Feminist Internationalism: British and US-American Women’s Rights Activists Traveling Inter-War Continental Europe“ (Web).
Quelle: Female-l, Veranstaltung für Frauen*

CfP: Nineteenth-Century Women and Conflicts of Law: Global Perspectives, 1815-1919 (Publication); by: 15.06.2022

Ginger Frost, Samford University (Web)

Proposals by: 15.06.2022

The editors invite chapter submission for inclusion in an edited collection on 19th-Century Women and Conflicts of Law.

The volume discusses the consequences for women when law systems clashed–between independent nations, colonizers and colonized, majority and minority religions, or between secular and religious laws. The 19th century saw industrial nations draw more and more of the globe into the orbit of their law systems, and it was also a century in which women contested their legal positions vigorously, leading to law reforms. Thus, it offers an ideal forum for studying the effects of legal differences across the globe. Conflicts of law were inevitable whenever people crossed borders, converted to different religions, or married/divorced someone of a different class, religion, or locality. Women were often harmed by conflicts of law, but this was not inevitable. In other words, these clashes offered both a challenge and an opportunity to 19th-century women.

This volume has no geographical limitations; we welcome proposals from historians of all parts of the world. The most important factor for selection will be the authors‘ ability to highlight women’s experiences when law systems clashed. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Conflicts of law in criminal justice (such as domestic violence and bigamy)
  • Conflicts over civil law (marriage, divorce, custody)
  • Gendered age limitations in the law
  • Women in imperial law systems
  • Conflict between secular and religious courts
  • The consequences of the lack of legal recognition for lesbian and transgender families
  • The regulation and criminalization of sex work across national borders
  • Women as actors in the international legal community
  • Disputes over nationality, dual nationality, and statelessness in peace and war

The proposed schedule is as follows: Continue reading